LeFlic17

Chris Gravett - Photographer
Arlesey Remembers You is a community project organised by residents of Arlesey in Bedfordshire to commemorate the centenary of the outbreak of WW1. During 2014 a poppy cross will be placed on the grave of each of the 87 servicemen commemorated on the village war memorial.The graves are scattered across two continents and as far afield as Iraq. It is a true community project. The crosses (pictured) have been painted and inscribed by children at the junior school, Gothic Mede Academy. Each cross has the words Arlesey Remembers You and the serviceman’s name and age on it. The reverse of the cross has a unique marble effect designed by the child who painted the cross. The crosses will in many cases be placed by relatives, in one case the only direct relative still alive, a 96 year old lady, daughter of one of the soldiers, will place the cross.
The middle and senior schools are involved in research, assisting with filming and in helping design a commemorative website.
I will post updates recording events in the project. A documentary film is being made of the project.

Arlesey Remembers You is a community project organised by residents of Arlesey in Bedfordshire to commemorate the centenary of the outbreak of WW1. During 2014 a poppy cross will be placed on the grave of each of the 87 servicemen commemorated on the village war memorial.The graves are scattered across two continents and as far afield as Iraq. It is a true community project. The crosses (pictured) have been painted and inscribed by children at the junior school, Gothic Mede Academy. Each cross has the words Arlesey Remembers You and the serviceman’s name and age on it. The reverse of the cross has a unique marble effect designed by the child who painted the cross. The crosses will in many cases be placed by relatives, in one case the only direct relative still alive, a 96 year old lady, daughter of one of the soldiers, will place the cross.

The middle and senior schools are involved in research, assisting with filming and in helping design a commemorative website.

I will post updates recording events in the project. A documentary film is being made of the project.

Spring

Spring

Yesterday I spoke of my weekend visit to Lavenham in Suffolk. On the way home, well to be honest a twenty mile detour to the East, took us to Flatford. Being so close and neither of us having visited there before we decided to take the opportunity to tick it off the list. Obviously another tourist hot spot we were pleasantly surprised that it was not too crowded. Being mid-morning on a showery early April day no doubt helped. Never the less I had to wait an age to get a couple of snaps of the iconic Willy Lott’s cottage, part of which features in Constable’s The Hay Wain (Just in case anyone wasn’t quite sure), without including folk holding up iPhones and pads to capture the obligatory ‘selfies’ in front of the cottage.

Yesterday I spoke of my weekend visit to Lavenham in Suffolk. On the way home, well to be honest a twenty mile detour to the East, took us to Flatford. Being so close and neither of us having visited there before we decided to take the opportunity to tick it off the list. Obviously another tourist hot spot we were pleasantly surprised that it was not too crowded. Being mid-morning on a showery early April day no doubt helped. Never the less I had to wait an age to get a couple of snaps of the iconic Willy Lott’s cottage, part of which features in Constable’s The Hay Wain (Just in case anyone wasn’t quite sure), without including folk holding up iPhones and pads to capture the obligatory ‘selfies’ in front of the cottage.

St Peter’s and St Paul’s Church Lavenham viewed from the old railway. Lavenham is described as England’s finest medieval village and food capital of Suffolk. There are certainly an abundance of beamed buildings dating back to the 14th century - quite impressive if you can catch a glimpse of any of them without 21st century automobiles parked two abreast in front of them. Not so sure of the claim to the food capital. We stayed a night at the Swan hotel - something of a belated birthday treat for me and I have o admit the food there was excellent and good value as we took advantage of a book in advance offer.
Lavenham itself although quite pleasing has a feel of Midsomer Murders about it - the demographics both locals and visitors are not typical of 21st Century England. Fortunately there were not hoards of tourists there (I assume it is a different story in the summer). There was also an absence of middle aged loud Americans, even when we visited Gainsborough’s House in nearby Sudbury, which was a blessing. The house visit was only undertaken because a free entry voucher was thrown in with Swan’s package. I tried to find something interesting about the birthplace of Thomas Gainsborough, his house and his work but I’m afraid this old master didn’t do a lot for me.

St Peter’s and St Paul’s Church Lavenham viewed from the old railway. Lavenham is described as England’s finest medieval village and food capital of Suffolk. There are certainly an abundance of beamed buildings dating back to the 14th century - quite impressive if you can catch a glimpse of any of them without 21st century automobiles parked two abreast in front of them. Not so sure of the claim to the food capital. We stayed a night at the Swan hotel - something of a belated birthday treat for me and I have o admit the food there was excellent and good value as we took advantage of a book in advance offer.

Lavenham itself although quite pleasing has a feel of Midsomer Murders about it - the demographics both locals and visitors are not typical of 21st Century England. Fortunately there were not hoards of tourists there (I assume it is a different story in the summer). There was also an absence of middle aged loud Americans, even when we visited Gainsborough’s House in nearby Sudbury, which was a blessing. The house visit was only undertaken because a free entry voucher was thrown in with Swan’s package. I tried to find something interesting about the birthplace of Thomas Gainsborough, his house and his work but I’m afraid this old master didn’t do a lot for me.

Recently I was commissioned to photograph and video a Greek Orthodox Christening. The service was held at St Sophia’s Cathedral in Moscow Road, Bayswater. The service was followed by a celebration at a Mayfair restaurant. This photograph is of the fabulous mosaic domed ceiling. Prior to the engagement I was unaware of St Sophia’s or indeed that Moscow Road was the centre of a Greek community.
This is what I like most about being a photographer - the broad spectrum of people and cultures I become exposed to and immersed in. Every project I take on - even a something as simple as a Baptism - enriches my life and experiences. That, and of course a very satisfied customer, is just so rewarding.

Recently I was commissioned to photograph and video a Greek Orthodox Christening. The service was held at St Sophia’s Cathedral in Moscow Road, Bayswater. The service was followed by a celebration at a Mayfair restaurant. This photograph is of the fabulous mosaic domed ceiling. Prior to the engagement I was unaware of St Sophia’s or indeed that Moscow Road was the centre of a Greek community.

This is what I like most about being a photographer - the broad spectrum of people and cultures I become exposed to and immersed in. Every project I take on - even a something as simple as a Baptism - enriches my life and experiences. That, and of course a very satisfied customer, is just so rewarding.

Crowdfunder.co.uk

We want to make an important documentary about this worthwhile community project. Please give us a little support and also share this link. Thank you

(Source: addtoany.com)